Pet physiotherapy is a growing veterinary sector, as both vets and owners begin to realise the benefits of physiotherapy for musculoskeletal, neurological and age related changes to your pets.

Tay Valley Vets offer physiotherapy treatments for dogs, cats, rabbits and horses. The aim of physiotherapy is to optimise function and performance. Whether the problem is a slight loss of performance or recovery from major injury, physiotherapy can help. Following an initial assessment, including movement analysis and palpation, an individual treatment plan is carefully created and prepared.

The cost of physiotherapy treatment is £40 for a 40-minute session for small animals. We have a spacious consulting room for the physiotherapy sessions for the optimum comfort of all sizes of animals.

To find out more about how our physiotherapy treatments can benefit your pets, or to book an appointment, please contact our friendly reception team today on 01738 621415.

Kim

About Kim Gunstone

Kim is a chartered veterinary physiotherapist treating humans and animals in the Tayside and Fife area. In 2005 she undertook her veterinary physiotherapy training at the Royal Veterinary College of London and qualified in 2007 with a Postgraduate Diploma in Veterinary Physiotherapy.

Kim is a Cat A member of the Association of Chartered Physiotherapists in Animal Therapy, (ACPAT), a specialist interest group of the Chartered Society of Physiotherapy. She has an active role within the Scottish group of ACPAT, helping to promote CPD for physiotherapists and promoting veterinary physiotherapy within Scotland.

Kim has regular physio clinics at Tay Valley Vets, as well as making yard visits throughout the region.

Our team provide a complete range of treatments and services for your pets

From free nurse consultations, to a state-of-the-art digital x-ray and ultrasound suite, our aim is to meet your pet’s needs, all under one roof.

Physiotherapy FAQ’s

What is animal physiotherapy and what can it do for my pet?

The aim of animal / veterinary physiotherapy is to optimise function and performance. Whether the problem is a slight loss of performance or recovery from major injury, physiotherapy can help.

Following an initial assessment, including movement analysis and palpation, an individual treatment plan is carefully formulated.

The most common areas of treatment are:

  • Performance enhancement and treatment of musculoskeletal injuries common to the ridden horse and working or competition dog.
  • Post-operative rehabilitation for animals with orthopaedic or neurological conditions.
  • Enhancement of quality of life in patients with degenerative conditions such as arthritis – slowing degeneration and treating compensatory muscle spasm.

In ideal conditions, nature will gradually heal the injury. However, for many reasons, these conditions are not always easily healable. In these circumstances, the injury will take longer to heal than nature intended or at worst may not heal at all. The aim of the physiotherapist is to optimise these conditions so that the body can heal the injury in its natural time span.

What conditions can be helped by physiotherapy?

The following are some of the conditions that can be helped by physiotherapy:

  • Soft tissue
  • Sore/bruised muscles
  • Muscle spasm
  • Muscle strain
  • Muscle tightness
  • Muscle atrophy
  • Routine checks and maintenance
  • Tendons and ligaments
  • Ruptured tendons and ligaments of the legs and joints
  • Sacroiliac injury
  • Cruciate ligament rupture
  • Muscle origin and insertion tendon strain
  • Optimise post-op repair.
  • Orthopaedics
  • Optimise repair of fractures both normal and non-union
  • Help to ease pain in arthritic and diseased joints and slow down further degeneration
  • Improving and maintaining range of movement and muscle tone
  • Splints
  • Wounds
  • Recovery from spinal surgery
  • Broken down sutures
  • Cracked mouths
  • Gingivitis

Your pet is a part of your family and of course, you want it to have the best possible quality of life – free from pain and discomfort. However, dogs do run, jump and bound around. They become involved in accidents and sometimes face injuries. This includes wear and tear on joints, the stresses and strains of an active life and age-related problems, which can all affect dogs and cats just as much as humans. Fortunately animals, like people, respond well to physiotherapy.

Why choose an ACPAT member?

It’s important to choose an ACPAT member to help your pet because these members are professionals in animal physiotherapy. ACPAT stands for the Association of Chartered Physiotherapists in Animal Therapy, and members are fully qualified Chartered Physiotherapists, who have trained specifically in physiotherapy and rehabilitation for animals.

Our physiotherapist Kim Gunstone qualified from the Robert Gordon University, Aberdeen in 1999 with a BSc Hons in Physiotherapy. In 2005 she undertook her veterinary physiotherapy training at the Royal Veterinary College of London and qualified in 2007 with a Postgraduate Diploma in Veterinary Physiotherapy.

Kim is a Category A member of ACPAT, which is a specialist interest group of the Chartered Society of Physiotherapy.

What our clients say about us

“My feline family couldn’t get better medical help anywhere. Thank you Tay Valley Vets.”

A Aves

“You won’t find a better or more caring and personal service anywhere else in Perth.”

H Wright